Why Provide Social Customer Care?

Why Offer Social Customer Care? www.sociallysupportive.com

Why Provide Social Customer Care? www.sociallysupportive.com

Businesses today more than ever are all about running as lean as possible. The digital space makes it easy for competition to pop up everywhere, and may times that means a race to be the lowest-priced option if all else is equal. So, it makes sense that leaders want to be sure something is necessary before spending limited budgets to begin a new project.

Social media customer care is no exception. Sure, you hear that competition is providing it, but where would you even start? That sounds expensive, and, well… it sounds hard. What are people even getting out of that? And why would you want to spend money to air your dirty laundry?

These are very valid questions, and the savvy executive will do good to ask themselves these questions. They deserved to be answered. So, here are a few answers to them.

Three Reasons (and a bonus) to provide social customer support

  • Customers Expect It. Even if you do not personally have a Twitter or Facebook account, that’s ok. Go to these sites and search for your biggest competitor. Is he there? If he is, then he has access to millions of eyeballs at a time when you do not. True, you might be advertising in another way or at another time. But think of it this way. If there was a cocktail party where plenty of customers with money were casually mingling, and businesses like yours could go and chat it up with those paying customers, you’d want to go, right? Now imagine that your biggest competitors are all there too. Did you just get that feeling in the pit of your stomach that you are missing a huge opportunity? Well, that’s healthy, because you are. What if none of your competitors are there? Well, if you show up, and they do not… who has the advantage now?
  • Lifestyles Demand It. I recently heard Richelle Carrol, Director of Social Servicing for USAA, discuss social media customer care on a podcast (Focus on Customer Service, hosted by Dan Gingiss and Dan Moriarty. Great show, highly recommend it.). If you’re not familiar with USAA, they are a financial services company specifically for military members and their families. USAA also happens to be known for brilliant customer service with sky-high NPS scores, right up there with the likes of Apple and Chick-fil-A. Anyway, Richelle recalled one interaction where a deployed soldier was chatting in with USAA to complete a transaction while being fired upon. Fired upon! She pointed out that might have been the only five minutes he had that day to take care of his life event. Now, not all transactions are that serious, for sure. But gone are the days when most wives were at home all day and could call the electric company between the hours of 8am and 5pm. Today, people are on the train, commuting to work. They’re waiting at the airport to catch the next flight. These times are not always convenient for speaking on the telephone; however they are perfect times to type your message from your smart phone to your service or goods provider.
  • Brand Differentiator. Speaking of that train ride, or waiting in the terminal. If I’m your customer, and I attempt to solve my issue while I’m waiting on my flight, then realize you’re not there, how am I probably feeling? Frustrated. Why can’t I chat or tweet or get you on messenger to solve my problem? Then, perhaps I’m curious. Is there another brand I could be working with that might offer this feature? Because I’m here to tell you that in my mind, as a consumer, that’s how I see social customer care… as an added feature. It also shows me that you care about me as a customer. About my time. And it says that you’re listening. Talk about differentiating yourself from the pack.
  • Bonus… It can be cheaper. Woah, wait… what’d she say? Yep. Said it. Say it again. It can be cheaper. Social media customer support has only really been a thing for less than a decade. The tools we have been using in the past to offer support have been borrowed from the marketing team, and really not set up to give us call center-type metrics. But in recent years, tools like Conversocial, Sprinkl’r, Engagor and Spark Central have come a long way in providing really detailed metrics. Some large companies are reporting average costs of $3 – $4 per social media interaction. And that’s for fairly complicated transactions. So, not sure how much your phone calls are costing you, but if it’s more than that, this might be cheaper. Plus, when you take the public nature of these transactions into account, you might save yourself interactions (What? What’s she talking about?) It works like this. Say you’ve released a new widget, and it has this new cool feature that everyone was so excited about so they ran out and bought the widget. Awesome. But, turns out the “on” switch for this feature isn’t quite as intuitive as the product team thought. Here come the tweets with questions. If you answer Sally’s question, and Bob’s, and Nancy’s, publicly on Twitter, other people can see both the question and the answer. Some people will just go to Twitter and search in the search bar to find the answer. And those people will see your answer to Sally, and Bob, and Nancy, and then they don’t have to tweet to you. So, you just saved yourself some interactions.

These are only three reasons and a possible bonus for providing social support. There are many, many others. Hopefully this gets you started as you think about getting into social customer care. Can you think of additional benefits specific to your company?

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