It’s All In The Details with Social Customer Support

It's all in the details with social customer support. USAA logo, property of USAA.  www.socialysupportive.com.

It’s all in the details with social customer support. USAA logo, property of USAA. www.socialysupportive.com.

Let’s talk about Net Promoter Score (NPS) for a second. This is a measurement on a scale from 1 – 10 based on a simple question: How likely are you to recommend this company to someone else? 1 is least likely, 10 is most likely. Any score from 0-6 considers the respondent a detractor. 7-8 is neutral, and a score of 9 or 10 labels one a promoter for that brand. Subtracting the total detractors from the promoters (while omitting the neutrals) yields the overall score. Of course, to ensure the validity of the data you must ensure an automatic survey set to avoid only happy transactions being calculated. The overall score of is thought to be a strong indicator of future growth potential for that company.

I find myself wondering this: what do the highest scoring companies do that return these fantastic results? Well, some of it can be observed as a high quality product. Apple is brutally dedicated to design simplicity. Trader Joe’s offers products you can’t find anywhere else. Other components include a commitment to customer service. The hostess at Chick-fil-A comes around asking if you need anything as you eat your meal. USAA lets you know about other services you might find beneficial, and changes addresses for all products at the same time. Southwest is known for excellent customer service from happy employees. And Amazon, well, I’m not sure if their customer service is great or not because I tend to receive my packages on time (or early) and in good condition.

So what can we do to be more like these companies? Well, measuring NPS is great, but you don’t have to institute a big survey program to get started on making customers happier. .  If you re-read the previous paragraph, what you might find is that regular attention to small details gets noticed by customers in a big way. Southwest is being nice to customers; same with Chick-fil-A. They’re just using their manners. Amazon and Apple are paying attention to quality on the front end to improve brand image and minimize customer service needs (hopefully) on the back end.

Social isn’t a place. It’s a way of thinking. When we say “social” we tend to think only of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and the like. But the point of social is to benefit from interacting with people and benefiting in some large or small way from the collective knowledge. Ask your customers what is important to them. Make every attempt to deliver quality the first time, based on what they said they wanted. If you make a mistake, use your manners to apologize and make it right for the customer.

Ask Yourself These Questions to Deliver on the Details:

  • Can I ask my customers what they want? If I can’t ask them all, can I ask a few for general knowledge?
  • Is there a way I can quickly and inexpensively improve the quality of my work?
  • Is there an opportunity for me to use proper etiquette more regularly?

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