Social Media Guide: Zendesk’s 10 Customer Service Best Practices [Infographic]

Zendesk posted this helpful infographic social media guide highlighting 10 customer service best practices for social media customer service. They’ve also provided more information on their post “Building a Customer Service Dream Team.”

3 Important Points from the Social Media Guide

  • The first tips call your attention to the working conditions of your social care agents. According to the infographic, 54% of employees reported that if they didn’t feel appreciated by their manager, they would likely leave their job. This is most noteworthy because many leaders skip agent conditions when considering customer service best practices.

  • Another subject covered in this social media guide is employee appreciation. Today this is made easier by new computer programs. However, it is important to also remember that personal recognition of a job well done can be very impactful for agents. In addition, public recognition of a job well done is very meaningful to the right employee. Being an advocate for your employees and creating a welcoming and comfortable environment really causes them to want to stay with you, and customers feel that.
  • You can also train your social care agents to be experts in their field. This helps make first contact resolution the standard, not the exception. You can get information on how to do that from my post titled Keep Your Social Media Customer Support Staff Informed.

Remember this simple equation: happy agents + simple processes + right tools=fantastic customer experience. Create your own social media guide for your team today!

Here’s to great service!

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10 best practices to improve customer support
– Brought to you by Desk.com

ProvideSupport’s “Brands Ignoring Consumers on Social Media are in Trouble [Infographic]

So, the numbers are in, and based on 2016 survey data 34.5% of people prefer social media for their customer service channel. That’s according to this new infographic put out by ProvideSupport. This is up from 29% in 2014 as reported in Infograph: Five9’s “Talk to me: Customers Crave Personalized Support in a Social World”  Which means that more than one-third of survey respondents state that if they had their choice, they would prefer to interact with you through social media. It also states that 90% of people surveyed have used social media to communicate directly with a brand. This shows clearly that more and more of your customers want you to engage with them on social media.

Brands Ignoring Consumers on Social Media Are in Trouble [Inforgraphic from Provide Support]

From: www.providesupport.com

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What Should I Do if I Miss a Tweet?

Missed a tweet? Late is better than never. www.sociallysupportive.com

Missed a tweet? Late is better than never.
www.sociallysupportive.com

You’re a community manager. Or a small business owner. Or a social media director writing process for a large team. You’ve set out a target to respond to your customers on social media within a set amount of time. Maybe it’s 30 minutes. Or, if you’re really on your game, maybe it’s even sooner. However, as you go back and check, there are some posts from several hours ago that somehow got missed. Or worse… what if the posts are from yesterday… or a few days ago!

I’ve got you covered, so you can breathe easy. Whenever you realize that you’ve missed the tweet, or the post or whatever, respond right then. Here are some things social science teaches us. (I’ll skip the nerdy parts that I love and just give you the answers, because not everyone here wants to know all about social science. You just want the answer, right!)

Why You Should Respond to Every Tweet/Post, Even If You’re Really Late.

  • Social Should Be Real. First, know that social media got it’s start as a platform where people are real. Pictures are more popular when they’re not perfect. Live streaming video is more interesting when real people are on the subway or at home with their dog and no makeup on and just act like themselves. Horns honk outside. People get interrupted by airport announcements. This is what is attractive to the folks who use social media. The “real” of the digital space. Go ahead and admit your mistake, if you made one (like being late responding.)
  • Liking is Important. Second, people vote for people they like. And people like people they know and feel they can trust. Admitting mistakes rather than covering them up, when accompanied by an apology, causes people to feel that they can trust you. And when you show your flaws a bit, you are being honest, so people feel they know you a bit better.
  • Give a Reason. Third, when you accompany an answer with a reason, people are more apt to relax and forgive you. Why? Because when someone feels slighted, it’s a natural reaction to feel that you are doing something to them directly. Ever have someone bump into you in a crowded party and spill your drink? Is your first flash of a thought “hey, why are you bumping me!” When the man who bumped you replies “I’m sorry, I didn’t see you standing there,” this changes your focus and helps to reframe the event from his perspective, where you see that it was an accident and not an undue attack. Tell them the post slipped through the cracks, or that a large volume of posts caused you to miss one.

Research in the customer service space indicates that when customers have a service issue that the company then corrects, customer loyalty increases even higher than before the issue occurred. One reason for this is because the customer has had an opportunity to experience how the company responds, and if they do so with empathy and a satisfactory resolution, customers now feel they know the brand and can trust the brand to do the right thing. Prior to the episode, they did not know the brand on that level. But once you’ve been through something together, you are bonded.

Now, it is possible that if you miss a tweet from a customer from last month and you go back to reply, you’re going to get a less-than-glowing response. And, that’s to be expected. But there is an opportunity for you to take that customer from having very negative feelings about your brand, to becoming indifferent about your brand. And it’s easier to move someone from indifferent to fan than it is to get them from very negative to fan. Also, it’s unreasonable to think you can go back to catch every tweet or post you’ve ever missed. And that’s ok, don’t worry about those. But when you have the capacity, and you’re unsure whether you should reach out or not… Reach out. Answering late is far better than not answering at all.

Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference?

Yes. (I know, you’re thinking “wow, she just came right out and said that with no hesitation.) I’ll say it again. Yes. And here’s why.

My family and I recently returned from a Disney cruise. The children had a wonderful time. They giggled, squealed, and chased beloved characters all around the ship. They dressed up in beautiful costumes and were treated like royalty. We all enjoyed excellent service from the staff aboard ship. They referred to the girls as “princess,” asked about our days, and even sang Happy Birthday to the girls (they’re twins, you see.) It was lovely.

But something happened prior to the cruise that… well, it clearly doesn’t negate the efforts of so many people working so hard on the ship. Our stateroom was impeccably clean, our servers were excellent, and the ship was so well designed. However one event kept entering my mind. What was it?

They never replied to my tweet. Yep. I had reached out the day before the cruise

Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference? Yes. www.sociallysupportive.com

Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference? Yes.
www.sociallysupportive.com

asking for assistance because in all the mad rushing to get loose ends tied up before the cruise, I remembered that I hadn’t ever called to schedule the girls’ birthday decorations for the stateroom. Because, you see, with twins it’s a bit different sometimes. Reading the fine print on a decoration package can save hours of tears because there was only one toy included with the decorations. eek. Don’t need that when we’re all in the close quarters of a stateroom.

So I called them, and I explained my situation. The care agent on the phone told me that there was nothing she could do for two reasons: one, I hadn’t called within the required 3 days, and there would be no exceptions for any reasons; and two, they had no provisions for twins and I would not be able to purchase a separate, second toy. And no, there was nobody else to speak with that would tell me anything different. Well, I do understand that I was outside of that 3 days, and I can imagine they might really need 3 days to plan hanging up decorations in a stateroom. But, being a parent, I decided to swallow my pride, admit my mistake publicly, and see if perhaps I could get a reprieve from the online world in order for my girls to have those little decorations in the room.

I tweeted out to @DisneyCruise confessing my error and asking if anything could be done. No reply. Ever. I had wondered, being that this was our first Disney cruise, whether that was a sign of things to come. But it wasn’t. Everyone worked really hard to ensure that we had a fantastic cruise. We bought the children these bubble making toys that play music (parents could do without the music, btw if Disney is reading) and a wonderful woman named Keisha from Jamaica was working in the shop. Seeing the sadness in the girls’ eyes when we found only one bubble want after looking all over the ship for these things, Keisha called to her leader and had another shop opened to bring more stock to her store. Wow. I mean everyone went all out.

Are you wondering what the point is? Here’s the point. You can do an amazing job with an amazing crew and hit the mark on every point. But if you’re not answering on Twitter, you might turn your customer’s experience from “unrivaled, unprecedented, hands-down NPS of 10,” into “It was great. But it was weird that they didn’t respond to my tweet….” and then a whole long story about  how @DisneyCruise misssed your tweet.

I struggled with whether to write this post because it seems a shame to call attention to one missed opportunity when so many people worked so hard to deliver a truly fantastic experience. And I will post about how going the extra mile can really leave a lasting impression on your customers to highlight all that great service. But the lesson here was important enough to share and can help us all out as business. And I’m sure this resonates with many of you, because it happens to us all the time. Something is almost stellar, but this one thing is distracting and overshadows the rest. And that’s what this lack of response on Twitter was: a distraction from an otherwise stellar performance by so many hard-working people behind the Disney Cruise brand.