Five9’s “Caring for Customers in a Noisy Social World” [Infographic]

Found this great infograph Five9 shared by Five9. I think it’s critical from an operational perspective to select a tool that allows visibility to traditional call center metrics. These metrics provide valuable insight into what is coming in and how much. Then, once you decide strategically which pieces to answer, it’s great to have the ability to turn the volume on or off.

Social Customer Care Infographic by Five9
Social Customer Care Infographic presented by Five9

Get To Yes in Social Customer Support

Get to Yes in Social Customer Support. image by pixabay.com  www.sociallysupportive.com

Get to Yes in Social Customer Support. image by pixabay.com
www.sociallysupportive.com

Let’s talk about merging. You know, good, old-fashioned highway merging. The concept is (as I understand it) that as two lanes become one, the people in those two lanes keep a normal pace of traffic until such time as the lanes come together. When this happens, the cars should come together, like a zipper, one and then the other, to form a single line. This takes cooperation from both parties, but it seems simple enough. I was driving to work this morning, trying to wake up and drinking my coffee, listening to some upbeat music on the radio. As I approached this merge point on the highway, I stayed in my lane that was going to merge with the lane next to me, and followed that white line to edge over. The person next to me must have a different concept of merging, because he sped up from behind me to get even with me, and blocked this merging action, forcing me to slow down. He basically entered my universe and said, quite clearly, “NO!” So, what can I do but slow down, and slow down the person behind me, and slow down the person in the lane behind him? Not much. Because he said “NO! I’M FIRST!”

His action came from a place of no, of not accepting what was happening around him. This can happen in customer support too. When we come from a place of “no,” whether it’s subtle or right out loud, it causes discomfort and things don’t flow easily like they could. It also creates negative feelings that, by the way, attach themselves to your brand. If that guy on the highway had a brand or a logo on his car, you can bet I’d associate his actions and my subsequent feelings about those actions with his brand. Anytime we tell a customer “I can’t do that,” or “That’s not the process,” or “You need to…” we are coming from a position of “no.” Perhaps today we can take some time to ask ourselves what it would take to get to “yes.” How far, exactly, are you from yes? Is there a small process or policy you could alter that could get you to “yes”? Are you missing something that could get you to “yes”? Certainly we must all say “no” sometimes, but I think after review you might find a few occasions that could easily be changed. The guy running me off the road to be first this morning was really probably much closer to “yes” than he thought, and I bet he could have made his own day a bit brighter by saying “yes” to me because he would have already gotten a good deed out of the way.

Think about how you can get to “yes” today. Would a few little steps help your brand be associated with positive experiences rather than negative ones?