Social Media Guide: Zendesk’s 10 Customer Service Best Practices [Infographic]

Zendesk posted this helpful infographic social media guide highlighting 10 customer service best practices for social media customer service. They’ve also provided more information on their post “Building a Customer Service Dream Team.”

3 Important Points from the Social Media Guide

  • The first tips call your attention to the working conditions of your social care agents. According to the infographic, 54% of employees reported that if they didn’t feel appreciated by their manager, they would likely leave their job. This is most noteworthy because many leaders skip agent conditions when considering customer service best practices.

  • Another subject covered in this social media guide is employee appreciation. Today this is made easier by new computer programs. However, it is important to also remember that personal recognition of a job well done can be very impactful for agents. In addition, public recognition of a job well done is very meaningful to the right employee. Being an advocate for your employees and creating a welcoming and comfortable environment really causes them to want to stay with you, and customers feel that.
  • You can also train your social care agents to be experts in their field. This helps make first contact resolution the standard, not the exception. You can get information on how to do that from my post titled Keep Your Social Media Customer Support Staff Informed.

Remember this simple equation: happy agents + simple processes + right tools=fantastic customer experience. Create your own social media guide for your team today!

Here’s to great service!

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10 best practices to improve customer support
– Brought to you by Desk.com
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ProvideSupport’s “Brands Ignoring Consumers on Social Media are in Trouble [Infographic]

So, the numbers are in, and based on 2016 survey data 34.5% of people prefer social media for their customer service channel. That’s according to this new infographic put out by ProvideSupport. This is up from 29% in 2014 as reported in Infograph: Five9’s “Talk to me: Customers Crave Personalized Support in a Social World”  Which means that more than one-third of survey respondents state that if they had their choice, they would prefer to interact with you through social media. It also states that 90% of people surveyed have used social media to communicate directly with a brand. This shows clearly that more and more of your customers want you to engage with them on social media.

Brands Ignoring Consumers on Social Media Are in Trouble [Inforgraphic from Provide Support]

From: www.providesupport.com

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What Should I Do if I Miss a Tweet?

Missed a tweet? Late is better than never. www.sociallysupportive.com

Missed a tweet? Late is better than never.
www.sociallysupportive.com

You’re a community manager. Or a small business owner. Or a social media director writing process for a large team. You’ve set out a target to respond to your customers on social media within a set amount of time. Maybe it’s 30 minutes. Or, if you’re really on your game, maybe it’s even sooner. However, as you go back and check, there are some posts from several hours ago that somehow got missed. Or worse… what if the posts are from yesterday… or a few days ago!

I’ve got you covered, so you can breathe easy. Whenever you realize that you’ve missed the tweet, or the post or whatever, respond right then. Here are some things social science teaches us. (I’ll skip the nerdy parts that I love and just give you the answers, because not everyone here wants to know all about social science. You just want the answer, right!)

Why You Should Respond to Every Tweet/Post, Even If You’re Really Late.

  • Social Should Be Real. First, know that social media got it’s start as a platform where people are real. Pictures are more popular when they’re not perfect. Live streaming video is more interesting when real people are on the subway or at home with their dog and no makeup on and just act like themselves. Horns honk outside. People get interrupted by airport announcements. This is what is attractive to the folks who use social media. The “real” of the digital space. Go ahead and admit your mistake, if you made one (like being late responding.)
  • Liking is Important. Second, people vote for people they like. And people like people they know and feel they can trust. Admitting mistakes rather than covering them up, when accompanied by an apology, causes people to feel that they can trust you. And when you show your flaws a bit, you are being honest, so people feel they know you a bit better.
  • Give a Reason. Third, when you accompany an answer with a reason, people are more apt to relax and forgive you. Why? Because when someone feels slighted, it’s a natural reaction to feel that you are doing something to them directly. Ever have someone bump into you in a crowded party and spill your drink? Is your first flash of a thought “hey, why are you bumping me!” When the man who bumped you replies “I’m sorry, I didn’t see you standing there,” this changes your focus and helps to reframe the event from his perspective, where you see that it was an accident and not an undue attack. Tell them the post slipped through the cracks, or that a large volume of posts caused you to miss one.

Research in the customer service space indicates that when customers have a service issue that the company then corrects, customer loyalty increases even higher than before the issue occurred. One reason for this is because the customer has had an opportunity to experience how the company responds, and if they do so with empathy and a satisfactory resolution, customers now feel they know the brand and can trust the brand to do the right thing. Prior to the episode, they did not know the brand on that level. But once you’ve been through something together, you are bonded.

Now, it is possible that if you miss a tweet from a customer from last month and you go back to reply, you’re going to get a less-than-glowing response. And, that’s to be expected. But there is an opportunity for you to take that customer from having very negative feelings about your brand, to becoming indifferent about your brand. And it’s easier to move someone from indifferent to fan than it is to get them from very negative to fan. Also, it’s unreasonable to think you can go back to catch every tweet or post you’ve ever missed. And that’s ok, don’t worry about those. But when you have the capacity, and you’re unsure whether you should reach out or not… Reach out. Answering late is far better than not answering at all.

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Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference?

Yes. (I know, you’re thinking “wow, she just came right out and said that with no hesitation.) I’ll say it again. Yes. And here’s why.

My family and I recently returned from a Disney cruise. The children had a wonderful time. They giggled, squealed, and chased beloved characters all around the ship. They dressed up in beautiful costumes and were treated like royalty. We all enjoyed excellent service from the staff aboard ship. They referred to the girls as “princess,” asked about our days, and even sang Happy Birthday to the girls (they’re twins, you see.) It was lovely.

But something happened prior to the cruise that… well, it clearly doesn’t negate the efforts of so many people working so hard on the ship. Our stateroom was impeccably clean, our servers were excellent, and the ship was so well designed. However one event kept entering my mind. What was it?

They never replied to my tweet. Yep. I had reached out the day before the cruise

Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference? Yes. www.sociallysupportive.com

Does Responding on Twitter Really Make a Difference? Yes.
www.sociallysupportive.com

asking for assistance because in all the mad rushing to get loose ends tied up before the cruise, I remembered that I hadn’t ever called to schedule the girls’ birthday decorations for the stateroom. Because, you see, with twins it’s a bit different sometimes. Reading the fine print on a decoration package can save hours of tears because there was only one toy included with the decorations. eek. Don’t need that when we’re all in the close quarters of a stateroom.

So I called them, and I explained my situation. The care agent on the phone told me that there was nothing she could do for two reasons: one, I hadn’t called within the required 3 days, and there would be no exceptions for any reasons; and two, they had no provisions for twins and I would not be able to purchase a separate, second toy. And no, there was nobody else to speak with that would tell me anything different. Well, I do understand that I was outside of that 3 days, and I can imagine they might really need 3 days to plan hanging up decorations in a stateroom. But, being a parent, I decided to swallow my pride, admit my mistake publicly, and see if perhaps I could get a reprieve from the online world in order for my girls to have those little decorations in the room.

I tweeted out to @DisneyCruise confessing my error and asking if anything could be done. No reply. Ever. I had wondered, being that this was our first Disney cruise, whether that was a sign of things to come. But it wasn’t. Everyone worked really hard to ensure that we had a fantastic cruise. We bought the children these bubble making toys that play music (parents could do without the music, btw if Disney is reading) and a wonderful woman named Keisha from Jamaica was working in the shop. Seeing the sadness in the girls’ eyes when we found only one bubble want after looking all over the ship for these things, Keisha called to her leader and had another shop opened to bring more stock to her store. Wow. I mean everyone went all out.

Are you wondering what the point is? Here’s the point. You can do an amazing job with an amazing crew and hit the mark on every point. But if you’re not answering on Twitter, you might turn your customer’s experience from “unrivaled, unprecedented, hands-down NPS of 10,” into “It was great. But it was weird that they didn’t respond to my tweet….” and then a whole long story about  how @DisneyCruise misssed your tweet.

I struggled with whether to write this post because it seems a shame to call attention to one missed opportunity when so many people worked so hard to deliver a truly fantastic experience. And I will post about how going the extra mile can really leave a lasting impression on your customers to highlight all that great service. But the lesson here was important enough to share and can help us all out as business. And I’m sure this resonates with many of you, because it happens to us all the time. Something is almost stellar, but this one thing is distracting and overshadows the rest. And that’s what this lack of response on Twitter was: a distraction from an otherwise stellar performance by so many hard-working people behind the Disney Cruise brand.

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How Can Online Customer Care Feel Personal?

How Can Online Customer Care Feel Personal? www.sociallysupportive.com

How Can Online Customer Care Feel Personal?
www.sociallysupportive.com

We know from recent customer surveys that a resounding theme exists in responses from consumers who want to do business with companies that care about them. “Don’t treat me like just a number,” they write. Or, “I want to feel like somebody at that company cares about me.”

We also hear that digital interactions such as chat, social media and texting are cheaper and that customers actually want to engage with brands through these avenues. But, how do you deliver an interaction that feels personal without delivering a warm and empathetic human voice on the other end?

Good question. We know that eye contact, warm smiles and an open-armed stance show people in person that we are open to what they have to say and willing to work with them. In a call center environment the visual clues are missing from the conversation, so we teach agents how to enhance verbal connection by ensuring they wait to speak until the customer has finished, being very polite and repeating what they understood the customer’s need to be. We also encourage them to smile while talking, because believe it or not, customers can “hear” a smile (it’s really true, if you didn’t know. Technically, the tone of your voice can change a bit, you can form your words differently because of the shape of your mouth, etc.).

So…then what happens online? What should we be teaching our chat agents and our social agents to ensure that these online interactions feel personal? You can’t see or hear the consumer, there are just these words on the page with few context clues to draw from.

Here are some high-level concepts to share with your reps to ensure they are providing online service that will feel warm, memorable and inviting.

5 Steps to Personal Online Customer Support

  • Research: Before an agent ever interacts with a customer online, I recommend that you provide them with data around who your customer is, generally speaking. Usually upon hire, an orientation is given that explains the services your company offers and to whom those services are provided. For example, let’s say you are a computer parts retailer. You provide online chat for your customers in case they have questions about computer parts. your internal market research indicates that your customers are primarily from the U.S. and 60% male between the ages of 21 and 50. Because you are a retailer and not a wholesaler, you know that most of your customers are end user hobbyists and not businesses using your parts to resell to others. Providing this information to your agents before they ever engage with a customer is a great idea, because it helps them understand who they are talking to. They can guess that these customers would be interested in the much talked about latest software release, new advances in processing speed, etc. If your social media team were being trained rather than your chat team, perhaps you can research your Facebook insights in Business Manager to understand additional information about the customer.
  • Prepare: Once the agent is out of training and on the floor, it’s a good idea to be ready when that interaction comes. Online transactions have a bit of an advantage over phone calls in that some sort of data is usually passed to the agent before the customer is “live” with them. Perhaps your phone reps get a customer account delivered to their computer screen with the initial call, but you’re live at that point with the customer and quickly scanning to see what’s happening. In the online chat space, typically the customer has stated their inquiry in a pre-chat survey and is in queue waiting on an agent. Train your reps to take the time to fully read and understand the customer’s inquiry before they engage the customer. For social media, because initial response time expectations are a bit longer than on chat, you can take this a step further and see how far you can get resolving a customer’s issue before you ever reach out to them. Yes, your initial response time is possibly longer; however when you reach out to the customer, it feels as if the agent is engaged, prepared, and knowledgeable about the customer’s inquiry.
  • Listen: Ok, in the digital space it’s probably more accurate to use the word “read.” Have the agent read all of the words the customer has written to ensure that no assumptions are made. This is an easy place for online interactions to go from being helpful and satisfying customer issues, to being a huge waste of time for the customer. Thoroughly reading and understanding what the customer’s issue is avoids the agent taking time to solve for what they thought the customer needed help with, rather than what the customer actually wanted assistance with.
  • Ask: A colleague of mine once shared that he would ask three questions of a person before providing a single answer. This was to ensure that he fully understood the question before providing an answer. Brilliant, right? Let the agents know that it is a good idea to ask as many questions as necessary to ensure the answer they’re about to provide is truly the answer the customer requires. This pairs directly with “Listen” above. Skipping this step, in my experience, is the primary cause for customers feeling that only very simple transactions can be conducted online, and that for “tough questions” they need to call in. When executed properly, this step ensures that very complex troubleshooting can be conducted in online channels.
  • Share: Let’s not forget this one. The agent should share with the customer what should be done and why before getting started. Now, by “why,” I don’t mean that we should burden the customer with all the technical specifications that allow that agent to do the task. That’s wasted handle time and, quite frankly, the customer is not going to perform the transaction so we can skip all that and save everyone time. What is helpful is that after all the listening and asking of questions, we share the diagnosis with the customer. This is important because it’s possible that the agent has made an incorrect diagnosis. Sharing the high-level plan with the customer and asking if they are ready to correct the problem can prompt the customer to share additional details they hadn’t known were relevant before. This extra information could completely change the diagnosis, and might send the fix into a different direction. This step of sharing can again save precious time for the agent and the customer.

There you have it. Five Steps to Personal Online Support. What.. what’s that? Oh, right. Those steps above seem to be outlining how to have efficient and effective troubleshooting with a customer online. So, how is that personal, is that your question? Let me explain.

The reason customers report feeling disconnected during online interactions is because the agent isn’t listening to them, doesn’t share information, or doesn’t explain what they’re doing. Chat and social media interactions seem challenging to customers because there isn’t an ability to say enough words to get the agent to understand what the real issue is. The agent is trying to finish the transaction expediently since it’s an online channel, and this can cause a rush to figure out the customer issue. This rushing causes incorrect diagnosis, which, then, leads the agent to perhaps solve the wrong problem or be ineffective at solving the right problem. The customer feels like the agent doesn’t care because the agent isn’t sharing any information and doesn’t understand what they’re trying to convey. (phew, did you get all that?) Time and time again, reviewing thousands of online interactions over the years, this is what we see.

What does  feel like caring, personal interaction to people is, of course, saying hi, how are you, how is your day going, etc. And agents are already doing this. But what really, truly feels like caring is when people listen and people help. We’ll of course assume that your agents want to help and wish they had time to listen. By providing them with these steps above and the assurance that it’s ok to take their time to ask some questions, I believe your agents will thrive and your NPS scores will improve.

Have a look at your chat or text transcripts, or review your social media interactions. If you find this to be relevant to your situation, but are concerned about an increase in handle time,  I recommend you try a pilot with just a few agents. The handle time impacts will then be contained, and you can compare the results of the pilot group against those in regular population. Happy trials!

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How Will Instagram’s Contact Button Impact Brands?

Contact Buttons on Instagram via Benefit Cosmetics. www.sociallysupportive.com

Contact Buttons on Instagram via Benefit Cosmetics. www.sociallysupportive.com

Who’s been watching the new Instagram “Contact” Button? I have! Brands certainly don’t appear to have run straight toward these little gems just yet, and that’s why it’s a perfect time to talk about what they are, what they do, and whether you need one.

Let’s back up to discuss Instagram. Instagram is primarily a visual social media platform. when you open Instagram you will find a few words on memes or as text over pictures; however it is largely just images and videos. Images are a great way to stimulate the senses and evoke an emotional reaction to your brand. Photos of nature can take people away from their urban grind and instantly bring them to a place of calm and beauty, while a photo taken of the winning team at the moment of victory can arouse tremendous joy (or great pain, if that wasn’t your team who won!) And a picture of a huge plate of nachos from your favorite restaurant can get your stomach growling in no time flat. We’re talking about desire here. What we’re doing is invoking desires.

Invoking desire and associating it to your brand is a powerful thing. Marketers know this, and that’s why brands are all over Instagram, getting into the visual “conversation.” It’s a powerful thing to create positive emotions and associate them directly to your brand. And, as great salespeople know, once you have customers all wrapped up in those positive emotions around your brand, you’d like them to take action… right now, please! Hence why the Contact button on Instagram can be so powerful. What if you see a picture of the brand new Nikes and you’re a huge fan and you have your wallet out right now! Wouldn’t it be neat if you could just push a button right from Instagram? Yes, yes it would. Or, what if you need tickets to the concert immediately, but you aren’t quite sure about the seat map? What if you could just push a button directly from that Instagram app and get the answers you need so that you could spend your money a little faster? Yes, now you’re getting the picture.

How does the contact button work? Brands activate the button and can choose to allow customers to call, email or text the brand. If you choose to have customers call you, then your impact would be some percentage increase in overall call center volumes to either your sales or customer care departments. I’d recommend a fresh toll-free number to ensure you’re tracking this all the way from the Instagram app to completed calls. For big brands, emails can be sent to your current group handing email interactions, however I would inquire with your chat and social care platform vendors whether these can be routed into your social care or chat tool. Also, when considering whether email is the right option, remember that you have excited customers who want to take an action right now, and email is a disconnected and sometimes slower vehicle.  Think about that customer who is all charged up, then sends an email, and slowly… slowly… loses that fire you created in him and returns to the regular grind. When you return the mail, he may not remember how excited he was an hour ago. If you’re already offering support via text, you might want to route through your current tool. Right now text service is being offered via both popular social care and chat tools, so you likely have your pick here.

Another nice thing about the Instagram Contact button is that it is a way to engage privately with customers on a social platform. Many large companies are still concerned about having specific customer care conversations out in public. These Contact buttons let you broadcast your message widely in a very emotional way, and then privately answer customer inquiries on an individual basis. That’s reminiscent of consumers watching a TV commercial and then picking up the phone to ask you questions about your product, which has historically been a very comfortable interaction for big brands.

So, what do you think? Should your brand use an Instagram Contact button?

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Why Provide Social Customer Care?

Why Offer Social Customer Care? www.sociallysupportive.com

Why Provide Social Customer Care? www.sociallysupportive.com

Businesses today more than ever are all about running as lean as possible. The digital space makes it easy for competition to pop up everywhere, and may times that means a race to be the lowest-priced option if all else is equal. So, it makes sense that leaders want to be sure something is necessary before spending limited budgets to begin a new project.

Social media customer care is no exception. Sure, you hear that competition is providing it, but where would you even start? That sounds expensive, and, well… it sounds hard. What are people even getting out of that? And why would you want to spend money to air your dirty laundry?

These are very valid questions, and the savvy executive will do good to ask themselves these questions. They deserved to be answered. So, here are a few answers to them.

Three Reasons (and a bonus) to provide social customer support

  • Customers Expect It. Even if you do not personally have a Twitter or Facebook account, that’s ok. Go to these sites and search for your biggest competitor. Is he there? If he is, then he has access to millions of eyeballs at a time when you do not. True, you might be advertising in another way or at another time. But think of it this way. If there was a cocktail party where plenty of customers with money were casually mingling, and businesses like yours could go and chat it up with those paying customers, you’d want to go, right? Now imagine that your biggest competitors are all there too. Did you just get that feeling in the pit of your stomach that you are missing a huge opportunity? Well, that’s healthy, because you are. What if none of your competitors are there? Well, if you show up, and they do not… who has the advantage now?
  • Lifestyles Demand It. I recently heard Richelle Carrol, Director of Social Servicing for USAA, discuss social media customer care on a podcast (Focus on Customer Service, hosted by Dan Gingiss and Dan Moriarty. Great show, highly recommend it.). If you’re not familiar with USAA, they are a financial services company specifically for military members and their families. USAA also happens to be known for brilliant customer service with sky-high NPS scores, right up there with the likes of Apple and Chick-fil-A. Anyway, Richelle recalled one interaction where a deployed soldier was chatting in with USAA to complete a transaction while being fired upon. Fired upon! She pointed out that might have been the only five minutes he had that day to take care of his life event. Now, not all transactions are that serious, for sure. But gone are the days when most wives were at home all day and could call the electric company between the hours of 8am and 5pm. Today, people are on the train, commuting to work. They’re waiting at the airport to catch the next flight. These times are not always convenient for speaking on the telephone; however they are perfect times to type your message from your smart phone to your service or goods provider.
  • Brand Differentiator. Speaking of that train ride, or waiting in the terminal. If I’m your customer, and I attempt to solve my issue while I’m waiting on my flight, then realize you’re not there, how am I probably feeling? Frustrated. Why can’t I chat or tweet or get you on messenger to solve my problem? Then, perhaps I’m curious. Is there another brand I could be working with that might offer this feature? Because I’m here to tell you that in my mind, as a consumer, that’s how I see social customer care… as an added feature. It also shows me that you care about me as a customer. About my time. And it says that you’re listening. Talk about differentiating yourself from the pack.
  • Bonus… It can be cheaper. Woah, wait… what’d she say? Yep. Said it. Say it again. It can be cheaper. Social media customer support has only really been a thing for less than a decade. The tools we have been using in the past to offer support have been borrowed from the marketing team, and really not set up to give us call center-type metrics. But in recent years, tools like Conversocial, Sprinkl’r, Engagor and Spark Central have come a long way in providing really detailed metrics. Some large companies are reporting average costs of $3 – $4 per social media interaction. And that’s for fairly complicated transactions. So, not sure how much your phone calls are costing you, but if it’s more than that, this might be cheaper. Plus, when you take the public nature of these transactions into account, you might save yourself interactions (What? What’s she talking about?) It works like this. Say you’ve released a new widget, and it has this new cool feature that everyone was so excited about so they ran out and bought the widget. Awesome. But, turns out the “on” switch for this feature isn’t quite as intuitive as the product team thought. Here come the tweets with questions. If you answer Sally’s question, and Bob’s, and Nancy’s, publicly on Twitter, other people can see both the question and the answer. Some people will just go to Twitter and search in the search bar to find the answer. And those people will see your answer to Sally, and Bob, and Nancy, and then they don’t have to tweet to you. So, you just saved yourself some interactions.

These are only three reasons and a possible bonus for providing social support. There are many, many others. Hopefully this gets you started as you think about getting into social customer care. Can you think of additional benefits specific to your company?

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Customer Support on Blab? Yes.

Customer Service on Blab? Yes. image by Jed Record. https://www.flickr.com/photos/jedrecord/21885360802. www.sociallysupportive.com

Customer Support on Blab? Yes. image by Jed Record. https://www.flickr.com/photos/jedrecord/21885360802. www.sociallysupportive.com

Ok, your first question might be “What is Blab?” Let me help. Blab (blab.im) is a new platform that lets anyone have their own show. Yes. You can live broadcast your own show on television. You can have up to 4 people on air in separate compartments on screen, have live audience participation, record the whole thing for people to view later. Not only that, but you can tweet to your Twitter fans that your show is about to start live, the audience can tweet that they are watching your show, and you can change the title of your show in the middle of the broadcast as the conversation evolves and tweet out that new title to your followers. Wild! It’s a game changer, in my mind. At the time of this writing the platform is still in beta, but is already interesting. This is Periscope, Meerkat, YouTube, podcasting and old time radio shows all in one.

Well, you know me, I love social media and I think that engaging with customers on social is a necessity. So I on Blab watching Tyler Anderson’s Social Media Social Hour (love it, highly recommend it) and he is great at really listening to his guests and pulling out important details to dive deeper into. He’s also very interested in getting to the live comments coming in from the audience. But I thought to myself that as Blab’s subscriber base grows, it may be challenging for one host to keep up with all the commentary and questions coming in. Hmmm. What to do?

I’m thinking that if you could have a person dedicated to audience participation and tweeting live while you’re recording, you could really get some additional engagement going on. Imagine, while you’re having your talk show about the product/service/topic of importance, as folks are asking questions, a representative from your company could be real-time answering any deep questions, tweeting out talking points for those who can’t attend live, and just generally increasing awareness. They can get the hash tags going, take notes for listeners, and keep track for the host while the host keeps the show going.

So if you are currently podcasting or streaming video, or even just thought about it, check it out, this Blab thing. It’s really neat! And remember that if you’ve got an extra set of hands, you could really maximize that participation and awareness.

 

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Salesforce Desk’s “7 Ways to Provide Exceptional Customer Service for eCommerce” [Infographic]

In this infograph, Zendesk points out that providing multichannel support is a key factor in ensuring customers shopping online can receive the service they need.

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Blast from the Past: QSR Web’s “Restaurant Social Media Top 10” [Infographic]

Posting QSR Web’s infograph titled “Restaurant Social Media Top 10” for two reasons.

  • To show how much social media has evolved. This infograph illustrates the number of likes/followers each brand had on respective platforms in 2012, which isn’t really even used as a key performance indicator by any brand today.
  • To show which restaurant brands were social pioneers! How fun to look back and remember the ones who took the plunge in the early stages.

Restaurant Social Media Top 10 [Infographic]
Restaurant Social Media Top 10 [Infographic]
Compliments of QSRweb.com and Foodservice Social Media Universe

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